Women's Running http://womensrunning.competitor.com Women's Running Magazine Mon, 31 Aug 2015 23:02:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 Short On Time? 3 Runs You Can Do On Busy Days http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/race-pace-jess/short-on-time-3-runs-you-can-do-on-busy-days_45770 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/race-pace-jess/short-on-time-3-runs-you-can-do-on-busy-days_45770#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 23:02:31 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45770

These three workouts can be done if your weekly schedule is looking a bit hectic.

The post Short On Time? 3 Runs You Can Do On Busy Days appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

More, more, more! It’s cliché to say we live in a world where more is perceived as better. Run more miles to get faster! Foam roll more often to prevent injures! Strength train more frequently to get stronger! Eat more green veggies!

What do you do when you don’t have more time to run? Here are solutions to fitting in three different key training workouts when time is limited.

Problem: You only have 30 minutes to run and you can’t make it to the track for speed work.
Solution: Speed Bursts
Run for 15 minutes at an easy pace. Then alternate running 15 seconds fast with 45 seconds slow. Do this five times. End the workout by running for 10 minutes at an easy pace.

Problem: You don’t have enough time to increase the distance of your weekly long run due to family or work obligations.
Solution: Fast Finish
Run the same distance you ran last week, but run the last mile or ½ mile at tempo effort or what feels like 10k race pace.

Problem: You don’t have enough time to wait for your GPS to catch a satellite before your tempo run.
Solution: Out and Back
Run in one direction for a set amount of time. When your time is up, turn around and run the same route in the opposite direction but try to make it back to your starting point in a shorter amount of time.

The post Short On Time? 3 Runs You Can Do On Busy Days appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/race-pace-jess/short-on-time-3-runs-you-can-do-on-busy-days_45770/feed 0 These three workouts can be done if your weekly schedule is looking a bit hectic.
When You Can’t Run As Much As You Want http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/when-you-cant-run-as-much-as-you-want_45653 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/when-you-cant-run-as-much-as-you-want_45653#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:55:31 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45653

Nicki Miller after a triathlon in North Carolina.

One of our editors found a productive, fun way to cope with a series of injuries that could have easily sidelined her.

The post When You Can’t Run As Much As You Want appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Nicki Miller after a triathlon in North Carolina.

Editor Nicki Miller completed a triathlon in North Carolina.

I’ve gone through a period of reduced mileage lately for a variety of reasons—Achilles pain, calf cramps, knee arthritis. At first I didn’t mind the break, since I’d been doing a lot of races, but lately I’ve been more annoyed. Especially since I went to a running camp in Wyoming a couple of weeks ago (which I’d highly recommend—there’s a camp for newbie ultrarunners in September that still has space!); instead of continuing to build on my miles once I got home, I’ve had to dial it back again.

At first I was happy to delve into other sports I enjoy. I’ve been road biking for almost 20 years, and I started mountain biking about a year ago. I thought a wee hiatus would find me back in action, logging long miles at high speeds on my own two feet, but sometimes your body has other plans for you.

I happened into a well-timed meeting with a swim coach with the company Finis, which makes a variety of products to help with swim training. Inspired by all of the Olympic athletes I’ll be watching a year from now and thinking about them using the same tools, I decided to hit the pool. I’ve been swimming since I was a child, but it’s always been my weakest leg in triathons.

Did someone mention triathons? Well, indeed, that’s how I’ve decided to cope. I realized four weeks out that TriRock San Diego is Sept. 20—perfect timing to focus on the sprint distance.

Related: 6 Great Triathlons For Beginners

To train, I’m doing three workouts each week for each discipline. Since the run is 3 miles, I can simply go for short training runs. I’ve been following hour-plus bike rides with 1 slow mile of running without pain, so it feels like progress. We’ll see if triathlon is the road to healing for the body. Right now it’s definitely helping my mind!

The post When You Can’t Run As Much As You Want appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/when-you-cant-run-as-much-as-you-want_45653/feed 0 One of our editors found a productive, fun way to cope with a series of injuries that could have easily sidelined her.
How Anorexia Almost Ruined My Running Life http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/how-anorexia-almost-ruined-my-running-life_45757 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/how-anorexia-almost-ruined-my-running-life_45757#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 22:45:31 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45757

One athlete bravely shares her deepest struggles and outstanding triumph with a very dark disease that affects many runners.

The post How Anorexia Almost Ruined My Running Life appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

My collegiate sports career started out in basketball. It was and always will be my first love. However, the transition from high school to college basketball hit me hard. It mimicked the difficulty of the transition from living at home to moving away to college. I soon found myself getting far too comfortable on the bench, and began running as a way to let out the stress of my first semester of college not going the way I had hoped it would. After basketball ended, I decided to ask the track coach if he’d let me join the track team. I soon became the sole female long distance runner on our small team. About a month later, I medaled in our conference’s indoor track championship. It was then I realized I had found where I belonged: in the world of running.

That first season of track, I trained alone a lot, and occasionally with the men. I was so naïve to running and to training at a high level. I didn’t know what an “easy” day was, but the runner’s high and the improvement I continued to see kept me hooked, ready for whatever workouts and training plans my coach brought my way, even if I didn’t understand the “why” behind what I was doing.

Four seasons of track, three seasons of cross country, and eight All-American awards later, I was granted the ability to come back for a fifth year of cross country, since I did not participate my freshman year. I desperately wanted to fulfill my dream of becoming a national champion, and unfortunately, a slight obsession with running and perfectionist tendencies turned in to a full-blown battle with anorexia.

Related: Running On Empty

I still saw myself as a bulky basketball player. My perfectionist mindset, combined with my own distorted body image, convinced me that was why I hadn’t been able to reach the top of the podium. Obsessive thoughts came around more often. No days off. Train three times a day. Weigh myself twice a day. Eat less. Eat only certain types of “healthy” foods. Run more. And I just kept getting faster.

I showed up to camp the lightest weight I had ever been. My coach was concerned, but I assured him it was just because we increased my mileage. I went on to have a tremendous senior season, setting PRs like crazy. I was singularly focused on winning it all. But I took third at the national meet, falling short of my ultimate goal.

Again, that perfectionist side took the best of me. Instead of being happy for all I had accomplished, I couldn’t stop beating myself up. I took one day off after my season and then began obsessively training again.

The post How Anorexia Almost Ruined My Running Life appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/how-anorexia-almost-ruined-my-running-life_45757/feed 0 One athlete bravely shares her deepest struggles and outstanding triumph with a very dark disease that affects many runners.
3 Bodyweight Workout Routines For Runners http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/strength-training/3-bodyweight-workout-routines-for-runners_45773 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/strength-training/3-bodyweight-workout-routines-for-runners_45773#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 20:05:41 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45773

A little bit of creativity and your own body weight can help you build strength.

The post 3 Bodyweight Workout Routines For Runners appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

*Courtesy of Competitor.com

There will likely come a time when you, a dedicated runner, will be confined somewhere with no time—or place—to go for a workout.

What’s one to do? A little bit of creativity and your own body weight can help you maintain fitness and build strength without needing to go anywhere. Dr. Richard Hansen of High Altitude Spine and Sport in Boulder, Colo., as well as Dr. Sebastian Gonzales, who works on the medical staff at the Surf City Half Marathon and Marathon in Huntington Beach, Calif., both believe simple workout routines that raise the heart rate and work the body’s core are worth trying.

Gonzales encourages time-and-space crunched runners to focus on exercises that challenge core and pelvic stability while also working on controlling internal femoral rotation. “This is the main mechanism of injury for many lower-extremity overuse conditions,” he says.

Next time you’re in an unfamiliar location with little time to spare, give one of these workouts a shot:

Routine 1

Gonzales recommends 4 sets of the following routine with minimal to no rest between sets.

The first exercise—burpees—will increase your heart rate. The second exercise—reverse lunges—allow you to focus on controlling your body while moving under labored breathing. The third exercise—hollow rock—puts the focus on stabilizing the core.

Burpees (15 reps)
Tip: “Don’t sag the belly, don’t jump too high and don’t flop to the ground,” Gonzales says. “All of this should be in control. Remember all we want is the heart rate up.”

Reverse Lunges (20 reps on each leg)
Tip: Lower your hips to a 90-degree angle and work the glutes by pushing on the heel of your front foot as you come up. Also, try holding weights in your hands for added difficulty (and benefit). Gonzales says to avoid the following: 1. Allowing your knee to “cave” inward; 2. arches collapsing; 3. hip dropping; 4. a truck-forward motion; or 5. bending laterally. “The point is to stay in perfect form,” he advises.

Hollow Rocks (20 reps)
Tip: “This is not a crunch,” Gonzales adds. “This is a isometric ‘hold’ into a pose with some motion.” You should be ridged and take breaks when form is breaking down.

Routine 2

Hansen suggests trying this longer routine to build your core to help improve balance and ward off injury. One set of this challenging routine should suffice.

Front Plank (20 seconds)
Tip: Keep your back straight and try not to go to your knees.

Rocking Front Plank (20 seconds)
Tip: For this variation, rock your body forward so that you put pressure on your toes. Go until your shoulders are past your hands and then rock back to your starting position.

Rest (20 seconds)

Front Plank (20 seconds)

Front Plank Leg Lifts (20 seconds)
Tip: Alternate lifting your legs in the air behind you. Hold each lift for three seconds.

Rest (20 seconds)

Side Plank (20 seconds)
Tip: Raise your hips until your body forms a straight line from your ankles up to your shoulders.

Side Plank Hip Lifts (20 seconds)
Tip: Focus on squeezing your glutes and bracing your abs.

Rest (20 seconds)

Side Plank (20 seconds)

Side Plank Leg Lifts (20 seconds)

Rest (20 seconds)

Side Plank (20 seconds)

Side Plank Arm Lifts (20 seconds)
Tip: Keep your back straight during this challenging variation that tests your balance.

Rest (20 seconds)

Back Plank (20 seconds)
Tip: Make sure your palms are facing out. Look up at the ceiling and keep your body in a straight line.

Back Plank Leg Lifts (20 seconds)

Routine 3

Gonzales offers another routine that will raise your heartrate while working a wide range of muscle groups.

Mountain Climbers (60 seconds)
Tip: Decrease your range of motion if you have any impingement in the hip.

Air Squats (20 reps)
Tip: “Thighs parallel to the ground” should be possible, Gonzales says, if you can put your knees and hips through their full range of motion. “If it is not, make sure you only use range of motion that is not painful.”

Wall Sit (60 seconds)
Tip: These aren’t easy. Get in a deep squat position and keep your back flush against the wall. Build up to 60 seconds and take a break if necessary.

The post 3 Bodyweight Workout Routines For Runners appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/strength-training/3-bodyweight-workout-routines-for-runners_45773/feed 0 A little bit of creativity and your own body weight can help you build strength.
Could Your Period Affect Your Cross-Training? http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/could-your-period-affect-your-cross-training_45777 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/could-your-period-affect-your-cross-training_45777#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 17:01:08 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45777

Find out if you need to make modifications for that time of month.

The post Could Your Period Affect Your Cross-Training? appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

NCAA runner turned high school coach Hillary Kigar has an answer for all things training! 

Q: I like to mix yoga into my running schedule, but I’ve heard I shouldn’t perform inverted poses during menstruation. Why not? Are there running exercises I should avoid as well?

There has been no research that shows that inversions (aka poses that require your heart to be higher than your head) have a negative effect on the female body during menstruation. As with any kind of exercise, it is important that you take ownership over your yoga practice and stay in tune with your body and what feels best.

If you feel very fatigued while menstruating, you might want to avoid inversions or other poses that are more strenuous, but you may find the inverted poses to be restorative and invigorating. The female body is strong and capable, no matter the time of the month, so don’t shy away from your normal training—yoga, running or otherwise—just because Aunt Flo is in town! Keep a positive mindset and remember to be flexible and make modifications if you feel as if you need to adjust.

Have a question for Coach Kigar? Email editorial@womensrunning.com or tweet @womensrunning with the hashtag #AsktheCoach.

The post Could Your Period Affect Your Cross-Training? appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/could-your-period-affect-your-cross-training_45777/feed 0 Find out if you need to make modifications for that time of month.
The Perfect Post-Workout Recovery Meal http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/recipes/the-perfect-post-workout-recovery-meal_45780 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/recipes/the-perfect-post-workout-recovery-meal_45780#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 15:03:10 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45780

Forget smoothies—add blueberries to your soup!

The post The Perfect Post-Workout Recovery Meal appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

If a speed workout zaps your energy, this purple soup will perk you back up. The yogurt gives you the jolt of protein that you need to repair your hard-working muscles, while blueberries, rich in anti-inflammatory properties, help ease soreness. Serve this in a glass bowl or even a wide-mouthed jar so you can savor the color along with the flavor.

Refreshing Blueberry Soup
Serves 4

2 cups fresh blueberries
1 cup orange juice
½ tsp. cinnamon
¼ tsp. salt
1 cup vanilla yogurt (not Greek)

Wash blueberries and place 1½ cups of berries in a saucepan. Pour in orange juice, and stir in cinnamon to combine. Bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.

Remove from stove and let cool 15 minutes. Stir in salt. Transfer the mixture into a blender to mix until smooth. Pour into a bowl and let cool completely. Stir in yogurt and remaining berries. Cover bowl and chill in refrigerator at least 2 hours or overnight.

VARIATION: For a tarter flavor, replace half of the vanilla yogurt with plain yogurt.
GARNISHES: Mint sprigs, thin orange slices or orange zest.

 

The post The Perfect Post-Workout Recovery Meal appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/nutrition/recipes/the-perfect-post-workout-recovery-meal_45780/feed 0 Forget smoothies—add blueberries to your soup!
How To Still Train When You Feel Drained From Work http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/how-to-still-train-when-you-feel-drained-from-work_45749 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/how-to-still-train-when-you-feel-drained-from-work_45749#comments Mon, 31 Aug 2015 12:36:15 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45749

Photo: Shutterstock.com

#4 is just so simple.

The post How To Still Train When You Feel Drained From Work appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Grad students finish their educations with the marathon of writing projects: the dissertation. In the year or two (or more) it takes to finish this monster, advisors remind writers not to take on too much outside the project. But what happens if you’re in training for an actual marathon at the same time? Both projects are physically and mentally rigorous, but if done right, they can actually complement each other. Here’s how anyone with a hefty writing workload can balance a demanding running schedule.

  1. Let running add structure to flexible schedules: It’s easy for a project to expand to fit the time you have; writers procrastinate, keep strange hours, and find it difficult to hit on a regular schedule. And yet consistency always makes a writer more successful. Different schools of thought advocate a daily word limit or “15 minutes a day.” Basing your schedule on the runs you have to complete for the week allows you to envision a more regular work routine. One professor I know recommends scheduling runs exactly the way you might a meeting and keeping those dates just as firmly.
  1. Treat your body like a runner first and writer second: When we sit at a desk for hours at a time, we tend to forget that there’s a body attached to the brain doing all that thinking, writing, and editing. Prioritizing your body’s needs encourages you to eat healthy meals, even on a budget, get enough sleep, and cut back on the alcohol and caffeine, all things that are notoriously challenging for students.
  1. Don’t overdo it: Even when you’re balancing long writing and running schedules, be generous with your expectations for the day. Avoid scheduling your week’s longest run, for example, on the day you’re planning to churn out a seminar paper.
  1. Dress the part: By now, it’s a well-worn mantra that people who work from home should change out of pajamas before tackling work. The change helps your brain shift from relaxation to writing mode. If you’re planning a run after a writing stretch, why not change into your gear first? Being dressed for a run will keep you more comfortable at the computer and will help with a quick transition from chair to pavement.
  1. Give silence a try: Being less-than-tech savvy and on a grad student budget, I didn’t bother replacing my iPod when it broke a few years ago. Instead, I started running without a soundtrack, and I haven’t wanted one since, even on my longer runs. I pay attention to my surroundings in a different way and even stumble upon a new idea or question for my project from time to time. Running without Kelly Clarkson to cheer you on may not be appealing for every run, but it’s a great way to escape the sensory overload of the computer.
  1. Build running support networks: I was surprised by how many fellow runners came out of the woodwork in my own program. I scheduled weekly shorter runs with a mentor, and when I moved to a new neighborhood, a nearby classmate shared all his favorite routes. Meet a classmate for a quick run instead of a beer or plan a jog together around a new part of town.

The post How To Still Train When You Feel Drained From Work appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/training-tips/how-to-still-train-when-you-feel-drained-from-work_45749/feed 0 #4 is just so simple.
3 Ways You Can Become A Happier Runner http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/3-ways-you-can-become-a-happier-runner_45671 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/3-ways-you-can-become-a-happier-runner_45671#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:39:33 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45671

Find your inner beauty to let that light shine from within.

The post 3 Ways You Can Become A Happier Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

SIGN UP FOR A RACE.
“Race day always makes me feel fierce and beautiful. New runners are often intimidated by the racing scene, but once you sign up for one race, it gives you confidence. Many new runners feel like they don’t have a place within the running community, because they don’t run fast enough or far enough. Racing helps you see that everyone belongs and gives you an opportunity to bond with other runners,” says Lora Mays, an Austin-based running coach who blogs at Crazy Running Girl.

KNOW YOU LOOK LIKE A RUNNER.
It’s hard not to internalize physical conventions, one of the most common being that runners are universally lanky lightweights. “Most women have an image of what they ‘should’ look like to be a real runner, but if you look around the start line of a race, even at the front with the elites, there is no one size. As long as you’re out there running, you are a runner,” says Tina Muir, a Kentucky-based running coach and community manager with RunnersConnect.

GET PUMPED FROM SOCIAL MEDIA.
“It’s important to surround yourself with positivity—that’s one of the things I love about social media. There’s so much inspiration, from someone sharing the details of the first run she’s ever completed to people posting about why they love running,” says Mays. Get motivated and pay it forward via your own posts and shares.

The post 3 Ways You Can Become A Happier Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/3-ways-you-can-become-a-happier-runner_45671/feed 0 Find your inner beauty to let that light shine from within.
6 Places You Should Never Put Your Phone While Running http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/6-places-you-should-never-put-your-phone-while-running_45666 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/6-places-you-should-never-put-your-phone-while-running_45666#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:35:53 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45666

It’s crucial to be careful and smart about how you store your phone on your person while running.

The post 6 Places You Should Never Put Your Phone While Running appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

*Courtesy of RunHaven

These days, most people have separation anxiety when it comes to their phones. Frightened to death that they might miss a “like” on Instagram or a text from some random acquaintance, many people (sadly) cannot even take a short run without their device. Sure, having your phone with you while running is a good safety measure to take, and it is a lifeline if you wimp-out and need a ride home. However, it’s crucial to be careful and smart about how you store your phone on your person while running. Never carry your phone in any of the following places.

  1. In your bra. While the sports bra might seem like the ideal place to hold your phone, it’s inadvisable. Inevitably, the phone will become so immersed in one’s cleavage that it can be lost or worst yet, waterlogged with breast juice. Moreover, if you try to put the phone atop one of your breasts, then you run the risk of chafing and being exceedingly lopsided.
  2. Down your pants. You may think you can wedge your phone in the elastic part of your tights/shorts that goes around your waist. Chances are, however, that gravity will work its magic and the phone will soon end up taking a journey down your lower abdomen and into your crotch area where it will become tainted (<-see what I did there?) with God only knows what.
  3. In your hand. It’s true that people actually run full marathons carrying a phone in their hand. I’ve seen it happen. The advantage to this is that the phone is at the ready for that impromptu selfie or picture of your favorite running partner throwing up or copping a squat. Yet, as your hand becomes moist with sweat, the phone will likely slip out of your grip and crash onto the hot asphalt. Don’t chance it.
  4. Taped to your inner thigh. Everyone knows that one of the best uses for duct tape is for attaching your phone to your inner thigh. Why is this not a good idea? Mostly because you will rip off hair from one of the most sensitive places on your body when you try to remove the phone. Also, your phone will likely rub against the other leg, causing some wicked chafing.
  5. In your shoe. Running involves taking about 2,000 steps per mile. Putting your phone in your shoe and thinking it will not break is like putting yourself in a race with Ryan Hall and thinking you will win. It is just not possible.
  6. In your compression sock, right around the calf area. The point of compression socks is that they squeeze the lower leg to increase blood flow. While positioning your phone in your sock might guarantee it stays put, it will also likely leave a permanent phone imprint on the tender skin of your leg.

The moral of the story: If you really cannot run without your phone, then put it in an armband, fuel belt or hydration pack. You and your phone will be much happier this way.

Do you carry your phone when you run? Where do you put it? Ever had a phone disaster while running?

 

The post 6 Places You Should Never Put Your Phone While Running appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/6-places-you-should-never-put-your-phone-while-running_45666/feed 0 It’s crucial to be careful and smart about how you store your phone on your person while running.
11 All Too Real Stages Of Needing A Bathroom On The Run http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/photos/11-all-too-real-stages-of-needing-a-bathroom-on-the-run_45673 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/photos/11-all-too-real-stages-of-needing-a-bathroom-on-the-run_45673#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:24:35 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45673

Photo: Shutterstock.com

We've all been there—the dreaded runner's trots.

The post 11 All Too Real Stages Of Needing A Bathroom On The Run appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

It’s every runner’s biggest nightmare – RUNNER’S TROTS! We’ve all been there! These are the 11 all too real stages of having to go the bathroom during a run.

The post 11 All Too Real Stages Of Needing A Bathroom On The Run appeared first on Women's Running.

]]> http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/photos/11-all-too-real-stages-of-needing-a-bathroom-on-the-run_45673/feed 0 We've all been there—the dreaded runner's trots. 5 Things Women’s Running Loved This Week http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/shoes-gear/5-things-womens-running-loved-this-week-15_45735 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/shoes-gear/5-things-womens-running-loved-this-week-15_45735#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 20:19:48 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45735

Check out which five items had our staff buzzing this week.

The post 5 Things Women’s Running Loved This Week appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

The post 5 Things Women’s Running Loved This Week appeared first on Women's Running.

]]> http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/shoes-gear/5-things-womens-running-loved-this-week-15_45735/feed 0 Check out which five items had our staff buzzing this week. Here’s How To Make Those Dreamy Goals A Reality http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/books/heres-how-to-make-those-dreamy-goals-a-reality_45732 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/books/heres-how-to-make-those-dreamy-goals-a-reality_45732#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 19:54:10 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45732

Identifying what you truly want is the first step toward a more inspired way of living.

The post Here’s How To Make Those Dreamy Goals A Reality appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Republished from Believe Training Journal by Lauren Fleshman and Roisin McGettigan-Dumas with permission of VeloPress. Check out the new journal editions at www.velopress.com/believe.

Defining Your Goals

Sometimes what you want is glaringly obvious. You are determined to run the Boston Marathon and you know exactly what splits you need to run in order to get that qualifier. Other times you might feel more ambivalent about what you want. The desire is still there, but it might be time to turn up the volume. Identifying what you truly want is the first step toward a more inspired way of living.

My Olympic dream began when I was a child, and it guided my life for almost 20 years. However, it was the yearly, monthly, weekly, and daily goal-setting that really navigated my route to the Olympics. It was truly an adventure, and along the way I learned some hard lessons about actualizing my dreams. I’ve coupled my insights with the latest psychology research to help you set, stick to, and accomplish your goals.

Related: Are You A Worrier Or A Warrior?

Dare To Dream

There are two sides of the brain competing for attention: the rational mind and the creative mind. Both are useful, but the rational mind often takes over, limiting your horizon. When imagining the future, you must allow the powerful creative intelligence of your feelings and intuition to guide you. An architect doesn’t begin building a skyscraper by thinking about square footage, electrical wiring, and a complete list of materials; she starts by envisioning what the finished product will look like, how it will feel inside, and how it will be used. Once she has a clear vision of the final product, she then makes a plan to build it. Give yourself the freedom to dream without regard for what is or isn’t possible—there will be time later to sort out the details.

Related: How To Deal With Fear And Live Your Dreams

Close The Gap

The space between where you now stand and where you want to be can create a great force of energy. When you are excited about the possibilities that await you, it results in enthusiasm, motivation and drive. This is why setting goals is so useful. Are you looking for increased motivation to train? Sign up for some races that excite you, or set some goal times that inspire you. Keep aiming to close the gap. Keep improving. Keep changing. Keep growing. And if you arrive at your goal, aim higher, farther, faster. You’ll reach beyond what you ever thought possible.

Fuel Persistence With Purpose

Meaningful goals act as a catalyst, increasing energy, improving decision making, and strengthening commitment. Most adventures will include detours or setbacks, so if you’re not truly enthusiastic about your goals, it’s easy to become dejected, lack fortitude, and give up. Your sense of purpose is what keeps you on track. It gives you the persistence to grind, stretch, fall down, stand up, overcome, improve habits, and make better choices.

The Journey Is The Reward

The media would have us believe that the outcome determines success. However, the leading sports psychologists, authors, and spiritual gurus agree that it’s more beneficial to focus on the process than on the outcome. When you embrace each step along the way, regardless of the final outcome, you win. While I did make it to the Olympics, in my heart and soul I feel my true success was having lived the athlete’s life. I was able to be a fully committed athlete in the sport I loved, and the lifestyle of traveling, training, and racing will stay with me forever, as will the friends.

The post Here’s How To Make Those Dreamy Goals A Reality appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/books/heres-how-to-make-those-dreamy-goals-a-reality_45732/feed 0 Identifying what you truly want is the first step toward a more inspired way of living.
4 Tips To Make Your Workouts Work With Your Skin http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/beauty/4-tips-to-make-your-workouts-work-with-your-skin_45663 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/beauty/4-tips-to-make-your-workouts-work-with-your-skin_45663#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 19:34:23 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45663

Follow a few easy guidelines to ensure your summer sweats promote a healthy, happy complexion.

The post 4 Tips To Make Your Workouts Work With Your Skin appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Published with permission by Dr. Patricia Norris, Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Contact Dermatitis Clinic at Oregon Health & Science University.

Running. Hiking. Biking. Swimming. Any extra time outdoors also brings some common risks for your skin. Follow a few easy guidelines to ensure your summer sweats promote a healthy, happy complexion.

Choose the right skin care products and keep it simple.

When it comes to skin care, try not to mix and match. Avoid layering on too many products before you work out as it may lead to skin irritation. This becomes increasingly challenging during summer months when outdoor conditions call for the use of multiple products, such as sunscreens, insect repellents and moisturizers. Play it safe by using products with as few ingredients as possible.

If you wear jewelry consistently or a wrist-based fitness tracker, using products with fewer ingredients will also minimize the likelihood of developing an irritation caused by the buildup of soap, moisturizers, sunscreen or sweat beneath the band. If you do start to experience redness or skin irritation on your wrist, remove your accessories. If symptoms persist longer than 2-3 days after stopping use, call your dermatologist. While the best line of treatment varies by person, a simple hydrocortisone cream is generally a safe bet for at-home, short-term relief.  To remove the buildup of lotions and oils that can become trapped beneath your jewelry or fitness tracker, use a soap-free cleanser, wipe your band with a small amount of rubbing alcohol after exercise, rinse thoroughly, and dry well—and give your wrist a rest now and then.

Rethink your sunscreen regimen.

Ultraviolet exposure is the most common cause of skin cancer. For outdoor workouts, wear sunglasses, a hat and long-sleeved shirts to cover up. To protect any exposed skin, use sunscreen with SPF 30 or more for best protection and don’t forget to re-apply it during the day. New FDA regulations require all products with SPF on the label to provide broad-spectrum coverage, meaning they protect the skin from both UVA (suntan) and UVB (sunburn) rays, both of which cause premature aging and skin cancer. Pick a brand that works for you—in terms of cost, a fragrance you like, how it feels on your skin—so that you’ll be more likely to use it regularly.

Most people use half the amount of sunscreen required to provide full coverage. As a general rule, apply what you think you need, let it dry, and then reapply the same amount again for full protection. Sunscreen in a typical facial moisturizer only lasts a few hours, so consider using makeup or foundation that has SPF for added protection. A mineral-based powder with the key ingredients zinc and titanium dioxide, for instance, is oftentimes more effective than a lotion with sunscreen because it acts as a natural skin protectant and lasts longer.

Some products like insect repellents can decrease the efficacy of sunscreen. If you are headed out for a daytime hike in a woodsy area, apply bug spray first, let it dry for 15-30 minutes, and then apply sunscreen. Apply your sunscreen at least 30 minutes before putting on your jewelry or fitness tracker to avoid locking in irritants beneath the band.

Avoid friction.

Ill-fitting workout gear can also cause skin irritation, with sports bras and compression shorts being two common culprits. Your skin tends to swell when you sweat, so without room to breathe, the extra friction against wet clothing makes irritation more likely. To avoid this, consider applying Vaseline to friction-prone areas, like around the band of your sports bra or in between your thighs.

If you use a fitness tracker, make sure it’s not too loose or too tight; it should sit 2-3 finger widths above your wrist. Lower the band on your wrist and loosen it after exercise.

Clean up post-workout.

Take a shower after you work out to remove sweat and sunscreen from your skin. Remove damp or wet clothes as soon as possible. Fungal and yeast infections occur more frequently in the summer due to excessive sweating and moisture. A common reason for dermatology visits in the summer is tinea versicolor, a skin infection that occurs from the overgrowth of yeast and causes a rash or discoloration of the skin.   In addition, to minimize acne, shower within an hour of completing your workout. Over time, excessive sweating without cleansing may block pores and increase the risk of developing acne.

The post 4 Tips To Make Your Workouts Work With Your Skin appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/beauty/4-tips-to-make-your-workouts-work-with-your-skin_45663/feed 0 Follow a few easy guidelines to ensure your summer sweats promote a healthy, happy complexion.
The Perks Of Graduating College As A Runner http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/the-perks-of-graduating-college-as-a-runner_45729 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/the-perks-of-graduating-college-as-a-runner_45729#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 18:42:03 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45729

How one woman made the transition from finals to real life with a little help from our favorite sport.

The post The Perks Of Graduating College As A Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

It’s been two months since I graduated from college. Throughout my senior year, I was so excited, as many graduating seniors are, for the next chapter of my life to begin. However, there were many post-grad growing pains I was not expecting that made the transition tougher than I anticipated. During all of these major changes, running stayed a constant for me. With so much changing around me, I knew running would be something that would always be mine. Some people have security blankets; us runners have our security running shoes. After a long run a couple of weeks ago, I realized running was helping me transition into post-grad life in ways I did not see before:

  1. Making new friends: Running helped me make my first group of friends after graduation. I joined a running and triathlon team in San Diego and meeting up with them 2-3 times a week provided friendly competition, camaraderie, and the support system I needed while everything around me was constantly changing.
  2. New running adventures: Now with vacation days ahead and no exams to study for on the weekends, I can look forward to run-cations or planning destination races throughout the year. I cannot wait to explore new cities and see how far my running shoes can take me.
  3. Opportunities to focus on my athletic goals: That race I couldn’t run because I had an exam the next day? That PR goal I couldn’t focus on because I had to split my time between studying, work, and clubs? Once I graduated, those races, those goals that I had to put off throughout college suddenly became more tangible and just like how acing a class was my priority back then, acing a race became the new priority.
  4. I can do hard things: When starting my new job felt impossible, I reminded myself how the first couple miles in a run are the hardest to get through or sometimes the entire run is not as great as you want it to be. But just like the tough first couples of miles or a bad run, a rough start at a new job or a bad day at work does not define you- it only makes you better going forward and reminds us we can all do hard things.
  5. It reaffirmed my resilience and confidence: Starting a new job, having your closest friends move away, and having new responsibilities post-graduation was really overwhelming to tackle all at once. My time on the road or the track reminded me that like training and racing, growing up does not easier for here on out, but we get stronger and tougher.

The post The Perks Of Graduating College As A Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/the-perks-of-graduating-college-as-a-runner_45729/feed 0 How one woman made the transition from finals to real life with a little help from our favorite sport.
What A Single Beep Means To A Runner http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/mile-posts/what-a-single-beep-means-to-a-runner_45696 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/mile-posts/what-a-single-beep-means-to-a-runner_45696#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 18:12:57 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45696

The sound of a mile done can be one of a run's biggest rewards.

The post What A Single Beep Means To A Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

The most motivating noise I hear on a run is the beep of my GPS watch. Each mile motivates me to go on to the next one.

That beep means I’ve made it through a mile, an accomplishment in and of itself. A mile may be really easy to me these days, but I will never forget when it was a huge feat. I keep that perspective in mind and remind my myself that one single mile at the end of a marathon can feel like an eternity.

If I have a set mileage for the day, I’m one mile closer to being finished.

While I love running and do my best to be present in the moment, I also love when the run is over. As a marathoner I hear a fair amount of beeps per week.

If you are a newer runner who is currently building up mileage, you can use this beep as a way to motivate yourself by changing the intervals at which your watch beeps.

If you have a GPS enabled watch that allows you to program workouts, set up a run of 5 minute intervals. As the 5 minutes are coming to an end, you will hear warning beeps and then a loud beep letting you know that time is up. Now ask yourself if you have 5 more minutes in you. If the answer is yes, continue on for another 5 minutes. This method allows you to hear the beep more often than you would if your watch was in the regular run mode.

Does 5 minutes of running still seem like an eternity to you? Don’t worry—at some point most of us have been there. I can still remember when a run to the end of my street felt like a long run. Mix up the interval time. It’s easier to ask yourself if you have more in you if you know the time between the next beep is something that feels short to you.

If you don’t have a GPS watch, you can use an inexpensive timer or a stop watch!

While you certainly could set your intervals for distances, like a quarter or a half of a mile, it’s easy to get caught up in the pace you are running.

If you run for time, you aren’t worrying about how much ground you covered in the 5 minutes. You are solely focusing on the completion of that time interval. If you have a GPS watch, you can look at the data afterward to analyze how far you went or if you are improving over previous weeks (but only if this helps to motivate you, not serve to discourage).

It’s often suggested that in order to find freedom on the run, one should leave their watch at home and pay no attention to pace or distance. While I do agree this approach can be great for those individuals who are very caught up in numbers, it ignores the motivation some of us gain from the watch. On days I want to make sure I am forcing myself to go slower, I still wear my watch, I still love the beep of the mile. I just don’t look down to see my pace and I don’t analyze the data after. I run whatever the distance may be for that day all on feel and let the beep motivate me to get to the next mile.

The post What A Single Beep Means To A Runner appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/mile-posts/what-a-single-beep-means-to-a-runner_45696/feed 0 The sound of a mile done can be one of a run's biggest rewards.
How To Choose The Right Compression Gear http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/partnerconnect/how-to-choose-the-right-compression-gear_45628 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/partnerconnect/how-to-choose-the-right-compression-gear_45628#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 18:05:11 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45628

Photo: Lester Cacho

Don't choose any old piece of tight gear—there's actually a helpful science behind it.

The post How To Choose The Right Compression Gear appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Photo: Lester Cacho

Photo: Lester Cacho

Brightly colored, knee-high socks and other form-fitting compression shorts and tops are all the rage among runners these days. In fact, with all of the hot pink, neon green and other bright-colored compression socks available to accessorize your wardrobe, these garments have become a glowing, as well as growing, trend in running.

But they’re much more than a fashion statement. As a runner, compression socks and other apparel can help prevent injuries, reduce muscle soreness after your runs and help you recover more quickly, enabling you to run the next day, even after a long or hard workout.

These tight-fitting tops, shorts, socks and calf sleeves keep your muscles warm and improve blood flow on cold days. In addition, the spandex-like fabrics efficiently wick sweat away from your body, preventing chafing and blisters when you’re hot and sticky.

If you’re considering a purchase, look first at buying a good pair of graduated, knee-high compression socks, where the compression is tightest at the ankle and gradually tapers off just below the knee. Originally developed to improve blood circulation and prevent blood clots in people with deep vein thrombosis and other problems, they offer numerous benefits for runners.

Not only can these socks provide an extra bit of stability for your ankles and calves when you’re running on an uneven trail, but numerous research studies have shown that they’ll help reduce soreness after your runs and allow you to recover more quickly. That means your legs won’t feel as heavy or tired after a long, hard day on the roads.

A good pair of compression socks increases circulation in your legs and accelerates muscle repair. By applying appropriate compression to the foot’s vascular system, you can reduce swelling and pooling of fluid that can occur during a long run or over extended periods of being stationary (such as on an airplane). Good compression will help move this fluid back toward the heart so it can be re-oxygenated and circulated back to the muscles.

To reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis from sitting for long periods of time, many people are advised by their physicians to wear compression socks on long airplane flights. For runners, they’re probably the most essential piece of clothing to wear after a marathon or a long, hard run.

A study published earlier this year in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research by a group of Australian and New Zealand sports scientists found that a group of runners who wore below-knee compression socks for 48 hours after a marathon were able to run significantly longer on a graded treadmill test two weeks after their marathon than a control group that didn’t wear compression socks.

Whether compression socks will make you faster if you wear them in a race is still an open question among scientists. A 2009 study published by a group of German researchers in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that compression socks had a beneficial effect on running performance when worn by a group of 21 moderately trained male runners who performed two treadmill tests to exhaustion, one without tight-fitting compression socks and one without them. But most studies conducted since have found little or no benefit.

In any case, many elite runners—such as Olympic silver medalist Meb Keflezighi, winner of the New York City and Boston Marathons, and Olympic bronze medalist Shalane Flanagan—wear them regularly in races.

However you decide to use them—whether for running or to recover more quickly from your hard runs or races—make sure your compression socks fit properly. The best manufacturers sell socks fitted specifically to your left and right feet and require you to measure the diameter of your calves to get a properly fitted pair. Also make sure the compression sock or calf sleeve you purchase is graduated—tighter at the ankle than at the top of the calf to promote venous blood return and has 20-30 mmHg of moderate compression, which is considered ideal for performance and recovery.

The post How To Choose The Right Compression Gear appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/partnerconnect/how-to-choose-the-right-compression-gear_45628/feed 0 Don't choose any old piece of tight gear—there's actually a helpful science behind it.
How To Burn More Calories By Not Running On The Pavement http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-burn-more-calories-by-not-running-on-the-pavement_45586 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-burn-more-calories-by-not-running-on-the-pavement_45586#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:52:24 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45586

Let's talk dirty.

The post How To Burn More Calories By Not Running On The Pavement appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

You’ve known it since you were a kid: Playing in the dirt is fun! As it turns out, trail running is good for you too. Not only do softer trails give legs a respite from hitting the pavement, but moving over uneven terrain helps strengthen muscles that don’t fire as often on the road or a treadmill. Depending upon the trail, the sights and sounds may even be magical enough to help you forget you are exercising. For those motivated by numbers more than fun, some sources say running on trails burns 10 percent more calories than road running. If you are still looking for your door to the dirt, here are eight ways to get started!

Run your favorite hiking route.

You know the route, the one that’s your go-to for mind-clearing walks. Try picking up the pace. Running a route you already know eliminates the chance of getting lost.

Grab a friend or two and explore a new trail.

Adventure loves company (yes, so does misery, but you’re missing the point!). Invite a friend to explore a new trail with you. The buddy system is a smart safety move, and having company will help to ease any nerves about trying something new.

Use it as a way to see natural sites.

The best waterfall, view or rock formation is rarely found next to a trailhead. Running from sight to sight means you can go farther and see more!

Sign up for a trail race.

With a well-marked route, snacks and plenty of company, a race is an easy, at least logistically, way to explore new trails. Be sure to check out the course description so you know what to expect. Also, consider starting with a race shorter than your favorite road distance to keep it fun.

Volunteer for trail maintenance.

Check out parks and trail organizations in your area for trail maintenance days. Extra help is always appreciated, plus it’s a great way to get familiar with trails and pick up tips on new routes.

Volunteer at a trail race.

Trail races tend to be low-key events. Races organizers often appreciate an extra hand, plus you can learn about a race before running it.

Stop by your local animal shelter and choose a partner for a day.

Many shelters have programs where you can take dogs out for hikes and runs. Taking an eager pooch along for an outing means you can merge your workout, a good deed and a whole lot of fun into one run.

Try fast-packing.

If you like to camp and like to run, try merging the two into a fast-packing adventure. You travel light, carrying all of your gear and food, and can cover more miles at a faster clip than if you were hiking with a heavy pack. Identifying water sources along your route means you’ll have less to carry on your minimalistic adventure.

The post How To Burn More Calories By Not Running On The Pavement appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-burn-more-calories-by-not-running-on-the-pavement_45586/feed 0 Let's talk dirty.
Crazy Eyes Shares Her Two Essential Running Tips http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/crazy-eyes-shares-her-two-essential-running-tips_45703 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/crazy-eyes-shares-her-two-essential-running-tips_45703#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 13:48:50 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45703

Uzo Aduba shares two essential things she learned while training for marathons.

The post Crazy Eyes Shares Her Two Essential Running Tips appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Just like her scene-stealing Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren in “Orange Is the New Black,” Uzo Aduba is a multifaceted character. At 34 years old, Aduba is an Emmy winner (for her role on “OITNB”), an opera singer (she’s performed at the White House) and a former track star (she attended Boston University on an athletic scholarship).

In 2013, the college sprinter added marathon finisher to that impressive list with a 5:17 finish at the New York City Marathon, where she ran for Team Continuum, a nonprofit that helps cancer patients pay essential non-medical bills.

Aduba again flexed her endurance muscles this April, when she ran the Boston Marathon (5:03:24) to raise funds for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The runner says the experience of losing an aunt and a cousin to cancer, along with the woman she describes as “her second mom,” was her marathon inspiration.

Fueling the Fire
Aduba says distance running has changed her entire lifestyle—especially her diet. “I’m always thinking about food as fuel for my body, for recovering from my last run and preparing for my next run,” she says. “I’m making a chicken salad as I speak to you. It’s got spinach, grilled chicken seasoned with garlic, and Laughing Cow light cheese. I make my own balsamic vinaigrette, and I add cherry tomatoes, red peppers and mushrooms. When I eat it, it’s like I feel my body saying, ‘Thank you!’”

Let the Words Fall Out
Aduba studied voice in college and says music was an integral part of her marathon training. Her playlist included tunes by artists including Common, John Legend, Beyonce, Marvin Gaye, and Mumford and Sons. “Brave” by Sara Bareilles was a special favorite as Andrea Trasher, who Aduba describes as her “second mom,” made it her theme song during cancer treatments. Trasher died last October. “I finished every run to that song, and even though I generally didn’t listen to music during the marathon, I did listen to ‘Brave’ at mile 23,” she says.

The post Crazy Eyes Shares Her Two Essential Running Tips appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/inspiration/crazy-eyes-shares-her-two-essential-running-tips_45703/feed 0 Uzo Aduba shares two essential things she learned while training for marathons.
How To Stop Being The Reason You Can’t Lose Weight http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-stop-being-the-reason-you-cant-lose-weight_45614 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-stop-being-the-reason-you-cant-lose-weight_45614#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 02:35:07 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45614

Quit that negative self talk! Your mental state has a huge influence on whether you hit your weight-loss goals.

The post How To Stop Being The Reason You Can’t Lose Weight appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

*Courtesy of POPSUGAR Fitness

It’s not just about putting in time at the gym and eliminating certain foods; your mental state has a huge influence on whether you hit your weight-loss goals. Old thought patterns can seem unbreakable, but moving forward is more possible than you think. Find out if these negative thoughts are holding you back from success.

You always put yourself down: Feeling bad or shameful about food choices or your body does not make for a healthy lifestyle; it actually hinders your ability to succeed. Health psychologist and Stanford lecturer Kelly McGonigal, Ph.D. explains, “If you focus on self-criticism, you’ll be like a laser on it.” Instead of focusing on putting yourself down, draw attention toward what you want to fix and accomplish. Above all else, treat yourself with kindness.

You can’t picture the new you: For women who have struggled with their weight for years, the idea of a lighter and healthier version of themselves might be difficult to fathom. Feeling confident about your ability to succeed is a start, but a more concrete project can be a huge help, too. You might not be able to find the words right now, but creating a tangible reminder, like a healthy vision board covered in inspirational images, will help you start to recognize what your dreams look like.

You’re too focused on a number: Sometimes you’ve got to stop with the scale; it’s not all about the number of pounds you’re losing. Instead of feeling dismayed when that number doesn’t drop, start celebrating other accomplishments — both big and small. When you feel more comfortable in your clothes or have more energy all day long, know that it happened because of your commitment and best efforts. When you realize what you’re capable of accomplishing, it’s like a domino effect: the positivity just keeps on rolling in.

You’re just stressed out: According to trainer and lifestyle coach Julie Barrett, MS, RD, losing weight boils down to one thing: stress management. When our bodies are under stress, we pump out excessive amounts of the hormone cortisol that reduces our ability to burn fat. Even habits that seem healthy can hinder your body from reaching your goal weight. If you’re overtraining or overanalyzing every bite of food you take, you can be doing more damage than good. Do your best to find balance in food choices, and keep up with a sustainable workout schedule. These shifts will make a huge difference in the long run, both physically and mentally.

Related Articles
8 Essential Exercises To Target Every Area of Your Body
Do These 6 Things on Sunday to Lose Weight All Week Long
6 Reasons to Try Interval Training
5 Ways to Stretch Your Calves (a Must For Runners and Heel-Wearers!)
Beginner Runners, This Workout Is For You, and It Will Burn Over 300 Calories

The post How To Stop Being The Reason You Can’t Lose Weight appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/health-wellness/how-to-stop-being-the-reason-you-cant-lose-weight_45614/feed 0 Quit that negative self talk! Your mental state has a huge influence on whether you hit your weight-loss goals.
It’s Time For A New Running Route When… http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/its-time-for-a-new-running-route-when_45583 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/its-time-for-a-new-running-route-when_45583#comments Fri, 28 Aug 2015 02:30:19 +0000 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=45583

Photo: Shutterstock.com

...your social media stalker calls you guilty of #9.

The post It’s Time For A New Running Route When… appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>

Photo: Shutterstock.com

Photo: Shutterstock.com

When you find the perfect running route, you want to stick with it. Maybe it’s an exact 5-mile loop, or maybe it has the just the right hill-to-flat ratio, but once you’ve found it, it’s easy to get comfy and never stray. However, it’s important to mix it up, not only to challenge your body, but to also keep yourself from getting bored. If you suspect you’re in a running rut, here’s a handy list of signs it’s time to find a new running route:

Related: Falling In And Out Of Love With Running

  1. The neighborhood kids have set up a permanent aid station for you at the 3-mile mark.
  2. You notice when the leaves on the trees change colors. As in, you notice when each individual leaf changes color.
  3. The package delivery guy has started to leave the boxes for your neighborhood outside your door since you’re going that way anyway.
  4. The hill that used to feel like Mount Everest now feels like a speed bump.
  5. Only one side of your body has tan lines because you always run with the sun facing the same way.
  6. You associate your neighbors with certain music because you always pass their houses at the exact same time on your running playlist.
  7. The dog that used to bark like crazy when you passed his yard doesn’t even bother to wag his tail anymore.
  8. You used to feel sore for days after your run. Now you sometimes forget you worked out at all.
  9. The last 20 running selfies you posted have the exact same background.
  10. Someone could mistake you for Bigfoot because you’ve worn footprints three inches deep into the trail from your strides hitting the same place every single day.

The post It’s Time For A New Running Route When… appeared first on Women's Running.

]]>
http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2015/08/just-for-fun/its-time-for-a-new-running-route-when_45583/feed 0 ...your social media stalker calls you guilty of #9.