Women's Running http://womensrunning.competitor.com Women's Running Magazine Tue, 02 Sep 2014 23:17:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Hungry Runner Girl: Treadmill Tips http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/hungry-runner-girl/hungry-runner-girl-treadmill-tips_29497 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/hungry-runner-girl/hungry-runner-girl-treadmill-tips_29497#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 22:52:17 +0000 Hungry Runner Girl http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29497

The treadmill does not have to be a source of dread. Try Janae's great training tips!

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I did 100% of my training runs for my first marathon on the treadmill. I have also run a full treadmill MARATHON. The treadmill was a great tool for my running during my pregnancy and extremely helpful for my life as a mom. Running outside will always be my favorite. I do most of my miles on trails. However I honestly don’t mind running on the treadmill. It allows me to run day or night, and no matter what the temperatures are outside. I still get that same endorphin high, a great sweat, and an awesome workout.

For the days that I am on the treadmill, here are some of my tricks to make it the best experience possible.

- Wear the right clothes. You are bound to get hot while running on the treadmill because, unlike outdoors, there will not be any wind to cool you off. I stick with lightweight tanks and shorts to keep me nice and cool.

- Have everything that you need in the cup holders of the treadmill. Water, chapstick, fuel, more water, a towel, bobby pins, your music, and whatever else you need to finish your run without having to stop. Being able to have all of your stuff at arm’s length (especially lots of water) in the cup holders while you run is really convenient.

- Distract yourself. I love reading from my iPad (I make the font extra large), watching TV, and listening to music and podcasts when I run on the treadmill. What a great way to catch up on all of your favorite TV shows without feeling guilty for sitting on the couch for hours.

- Test yourself. I love playing around with the speed and testing out my current fitness level. Most of my runs on the treadmill are progressive runs where I turn up the speed each mile. I also love throwing in fartleks or doing 400/800/mile repeats. Try some chorus sprints where you set the treadmill to a sprint during the chorus of the songs that you are listening to!

- Switch up the incline. Do you have an upcoming hilly race? Try to mimic the course by creating similar hills on the treadmill. You can bring the race elevation chart with you so you can mimic the course. Hill repeats are an incredible workout and if you live in a flat area, the treadmill may be your best option to do them. It is amazing how quickly my heart rate goes up when I throw in a few hills on the treadmill.

- Focus on your form. For every 1/2 mile of your run, focus on different parts of your form (arm swing, legs, stride, posture) and try to improve them. For the last mile of your run on the treadmill, put all of those parts together for some good looking running form.

- Use the treadmill to force yourself to slow down. Are you one of those runners that loves going fast every single day, and are feeling burned out or constantly injured? Then try using a treadmill to slow you down on those days. You can set it at a slower speed, zone out and force yourself to relax.

- Use it as mental training. If the treadmill is really hard for you, then every time you do have to use it, just think of it as great mental training. You are accomplishing something that is really hard, which is making you mentally tougher. If you can run miles and miles on a treadmill, just think of how easy it will be mentally when you are running outside again.

What are your feelings towards the treadmill? Tweet @hungryrunnergrl and @womensrunning to let us know!

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Keep Your No Sugar Vow On-The-Go http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/partnerconnect/keeping-your-no-sugar-vow-when-on-the-go_29284 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/partnerconnect/keeping-your-no-sugar-vow-when-on-the-go_29284#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 20:37:12 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29284

You’ve successfully dodged cookies, cakes, and sugary snacks in your day-to-day routine, but now you’re headed on a getaway and worried

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No Sugar Vow Header

You’ve successfully dodged cookies, cakes, and sugary snacks in your day-to-day routine, but now you’re headed on a getaway and worried that avoiding refined sugar is going to prove more trying.

To make sure you don’t veer too far off track, we pulled together a list of tips for staying sugar-free on the go.

1. Prep before you go.
A little prep goes a long way when you’re traveling. Pre-pack a few healthy finger foods like kumquats (so refreshing!), nuts, or dried fruit (be sure to look for no sugar added) to keep glucose levels from dropping.

2. Don’t forget to exercise.
It might be tempting to skip a workout while on vacation, but if you’re looking to curb your sugar intake, fitness could be the key to maintaining your routine. Work up a sweat in your hotel room or catch a class at a local yoga or spin studio.

Recommended: Surprising Fast Food Pitfalls

3. Even cocktails have sugar.
Tempted to throw back a fancy cocktail while you’re out to dinner? Be cognizant of the fact that mixed drinks often include added sugar. Stick to the tried and true glass of red wine. Prefer to stay away from alcohol all together? Squeeze some oranges, lemons, or limes into seltzer for a refreshing pick-me-up.

4. Keep your emotions in check.
Travel—for business or pleasure—can be stressful. When you’re worked up about travel schedules or landing the perfect dinner reservation, your body will release the stress hormone cortisol, which can cause cravings for something sweet. Keep your cortisol levels in check in the moment by taking a few deep breaths. And make sure you’re getting enough sleep so your body has time to recoup from a busy day.

5. It’s a team effort.
Whether you’re traveling with co-workers or family, let everyone know about your dietary restrictions. If the whole group is aware of your preferences, it can be taken into account when you’re choosing a restaurant or a bar.

This story powered by Even Hotels, which welcomes guests to travel well by keeping active, resting easy, eating well and accomplishing more. Find more at Wellwellwell.com.

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T-Rex Runner: How Do You Do It? http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/t-rex-runner/t-rex-runner-how-do-you-do-it_29462 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/t-rex-runner/t-rex-runner-how-do-you-do-it_29462#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 16:00:11 +0000 T-Rex Runner http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29462

What works for some runners doesn't work for others.

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I’m battling a nasty sinus infection this week. The old running wisdom that says it is fine to run if you’re sick from the neck up (i.e. headcold, sinus infection, etc.) but should stay home if the illness is from the neck down (i.e. bronchitis) has popped into my head. As much as I’d theoretically like to lace up my sneakers and hit the road, I’m way too weak to do much besides get out of bed. It got me thinking about some things runners do that I personally cannot even fathom, like the following:

  1. Running when you’re sick: I can barely move, and you’re doing 10 miles? What? How are you not dying? Am I just inherently weak or are you some type of superhuman? Does anyone actually follow that “neck up vs neck down” advice, or is everyone just out there running no matter what? And seriously, where do you get your IVs done, because I want whatever you’re getting.
  2. Genuinely enjoying a 5 am wake up call: I know that a lot of people only have time to run in the morning. Personally I wake up early most mornings of the week to get a workout in. I totally understand needing to do it, but my goodness, enjoying it? Am I the only person who literally counts down the minutes left before I have to be up and out of bed with running shoes on and starts panicking when I realize how few there are left? I love you, morning people, but I don’t have to like you right now.
  3. Having a “favorite” flavor of Gu: My stomach doesn’t tolerate gels anymore, but when it did, I used to have a favorite flavor of Gu: chocolate. When non-runners would inquire what it tasted like and whether or not it was disgusting, I would say “Oh, it tastes just like chocolate frosting!” I was obviously delusional. My lord, what lies we tell ourselves to get that fuel in! Now that I don’t eat it anymore and have weaned myself off the gel Kool-Aid, I can finally admit that no, they don’t taste like chocolate frosting. Not even close. But hey, whatever works.
  4. Not chafing in runderwear: I am just aghast whenever I see people wearing really short shorts or runderwear and running long distances. HOW DO YOU DO IT? Seeing bare thighs separated by no material gives me actual physical anxiety. I want to run up to everyone and hand them a pair of compression shorts.
  5. Running through water stops and actually getting water in your mouth: If my hypothetical qualification for Boston should ever hinge on whether or not I can run through water stops and drink water at the same time, I will never qualify for Boston. I can barely drink water while walking, let along running. I know, I know, pinch the top of the cup and then create a little funnel with which to pour water into your mouth. Great idea in theory, but I’m not even coordinated to do that. Coordinated runners of the world, I applaud you.

We all have our little idiosyncrasies about the times, places, and ways we like to run. What can you not imagine doing as it pertains to running? Tweet @thetrexrunner and @womensrunning to let us know!

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Reader Run Brag Gallery 9/2/2014 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/just-for-fun/reader-run-brag-gallery-922014_29351 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/09/just-for-fun/reader-run-brag-gallery-922014_29351#comments Tue, 02 Sep 2014 12:56:09 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29351

Our readers spent their long weekend running! Check out this week's #RunBrag Gallery!

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We love to celebrate the accomplishments of our Women’s Running readers. Take a look at the latest gallery of #runbrag photos from our favorite run girls – YOU!

Want to be featured in a future Women’s Running Reader Run Brag gallery? Email your weekend race photos to runbrag@womensrunning.com for a chance to be included, or tweet us @WomensRunning using  #runbrag.

*You must own all rights to submitted photos. 

CHECK OUT ALL OF OUR READER RUN BRAG GALLERIES HERE!

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Photo: Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport.

  Air travel can be very much a game of hurry up and wait. With long layovers and unexpected delays, you might find yourself twiddling

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Photo: Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport.

Photo: Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport.

Photo: Courtesy of San Francisco International Airport.

 

Air travel can be very much a game of hurry up and wait. With long layovers and unexpected delays, you might find yourself twiddling your thumbs, ready to ditch the gossip rag you’ve read cover-to-cover…twice.

Good news for those looking for a more active way to pass the time: Airports have taken note of our collective desire to get up and move, offering fitness facilities and walking paths as an alternative to food courts and lounges. In cities like San Francisco and Chicago, restless travelers can now stretch their limbs—without attracting unwanted glances—in quiet, bamboo-floored yoga studios. What better way to remove the stress of travel than with a few moments of meditation and a downward dog or two? Walking paths have also caught on in many airports, including those in Minneapolis and Cleveland. Mile markers make it easy to track progress within designated routes.

Have some downtime? If you’re visiting any one of theses five fitness-forward airports, you’re in luck:

Dallas/Fort Worth Airport (DFW)

  • Offers: Yoga studio, walking path
  • Location: Terminal D
  • Cost: Free
  • Good to know: The 24-hour yoga studio provides mats and has instructional videos on display. The walking path goes from gate D6 to D40. There are also two 55-foot-high staircases in terminal D—perfect for the ambitious stair-stepper.

San Francisco International Airport (SFO)

  • Offers: Yoga studios
  • Location: Terminal 2 and Terminal 3
  • Cost: Free
  • Good to know: Yoga mats and props are available and the studios are open 24 hours a day. The rooms are dimly lit and are noise- and cell phone-free zones.

Recommended: Three On-the-Go Germ Fighting Tools

Chicago O’Hare Airport (ORD)

  • Offers: Yoga studio
  • Location: Terminal 3
  • Cost: Free
  • Good to know: With instructional videos on display, the facility is great for all levels. Inside you’ll find full-length mirrors, bamboo floors, and a relaxing playlist.

Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport (MSP)

  • Offers: Walking path (total distance: 1.4 miles)
  • Location: Lindbergh Terminal starting at the intersection of the C and D concourses
  • Cost: Free
  • Good to know: The path, developed with the help of the American Heart Association, includes green overhead markers every tenth of a mile, so you can track your progress.

Cleveland Hopkins International Airport (CLE)

  • Offers: Walking path (total distance: 2 miles)
  • Location: Located throughout all four concourses
  • Cost: Free
  • Good to know: This path was also developed with the help of the American Heart Association. You’ll also find healthy eating and exercise tips posted throughout the building for additional inspiration.

This story powered by Even Hotels, which welcomes guests to travel well by keeping active, resting easy, eating well and accomplishing more. Find more at Wellwellwell.comwellwellwell.com-Fueled-by-EVEN-Hotels[2]

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Rise and Shine–Quick Wakeup Workout (No Gym Required) http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/rise-and-shine-quick-wakeup-workout-no-gym-required_29326 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/rise-and-shine-quick-wakeup-workout-no-gym-required_29326#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:49:07 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29326

Dragging yourself out of bed in the morning is no easy feat, and when your next stop is the gym, pulling off those covers can be even less

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Dragging yourself out of bed in the morning is no easy feat, and when your next stop is the gym, pulling off those covers can be even less appealing. It’s time to push aside those feelings—as well as those covers—because there are many reasons why a morning workout is the perfect way to start your day, especially if you’re traveling.

Recommended: Workout your Whole Body in One Move

Fitness expert and Wellwellwell contributor Tammy Stokes shares an exclusive routine guaranteed to get your heart rate going. The best part? You don’t need a gym, and the workout only takes 10 minutes. Whether you’re at home or in a hotel, time is no longer an excuse. So wake up, find some open space and queue up the video below. You’ll be done before your first pot of coffee is ready.

This story powered by Even Hotels, which welcomes guests to travel well by keeping active, resting easy, eating well and accomplishing more. Find more at Wellwellwell.com.

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Meditation: De-Stress Anywhere http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/meditation-de-stress-anywhere_29305 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/meditation-de-stress-anywhere_29305#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 20:36:17 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29305

Meditation, simple as it is, can seem daunting. Do you need props? An instructor? Dead silence and blackout shades? A trip to Tibet? Easing

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Meditation, simple as it is, can seem daunting. Do you need props? An instructor? Dead silence and blackout shades? A trip to Tibet?

Easing into this ancient practice is easier than you might think. You just need patience and an open mind. After all, there isn’t a right or wrong way to meditate and the experience is different for everyone.

The benefits are nearly infinite: Meditation can help you gain perspective and increase self-awareness. You can develop a more tranquil demeanor, become less likely to anger over petty things, gain a sense of calm, lose anxiety, become more focused and less distracted. The list goes on.

With no special equipment necessary and a compelling upside, there’s virtually no reason not to give meditation a try. Bliss out with one of the four most popular types below.

Guided
For those with a colorful imagination, guided meditation is a great option. This method involves picturing scenery you find relaxing. Incorporating different senses—like touch, smell and sound—can really encourage the process. If the beach puts you in a good mood, try lighting a tropical candle, sifting sand through your hands and listening to the calming sound of the waves for just a few minutes.

Mantra
Many Buddhist practices are based on mantra meditation, where you repeat a word or phrase while you meditate to put a halt to the mind’s racing thoughts. This practice is particularly helpful when you have a lot on your mind, need to pull yourself away from a hectic situation and calm down. An ancient Hindu mantra—and probably one of the simplest—is the single syllable “om.”

Recommended: Keep Travel Stress in Check: Road Rules

Mindfulness
This type of meditation is centered on a more abstract concept, in which you increase the conscious awareness of your surroundings and experience. The goal is not to change how you are, but rather become aware of what is already true. Recognize what is happening around you; be open and inviting to it. Practicing mindfulness is a great way to become at peace with your thoughts and your condition.

Transcendental
Perfect for travel, transcendental is much like mantra meditation, wherein you choose a word or phrase to repeat, however you do so silently. If you are feeling unsettled on the airplane, car ride or even in your hotel room, try sitting down, closing your eyes and concentrating on a single mantra to create your own “island of calm,” as practitioner Paul McCartney put it.

This story powered by Even Hotels, which welcomes guests to travel well by keeping active, resting easy, eating well and accomplishing more. Find more at Wellwellwell.com.

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Eat Pray Love DC: Learning to Run Your Own Race http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/eat-pray-run-dc/eat-pray-love-dc-learning-to-run-your-own-race_29299 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/eat-pray-run-dc/eat-pray-love-dc-learning-to-run-your-own-race_29299#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 19:20:12 +0000 Eat Pray Run DC http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29299

Stop comparing yourself to others and start focusing on your own running!

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20k-finish

One of the best things about being a runner is taking part in the amazing community. I love sharing my favorite physical activity with friends, family and lots of random people on the internet I may never meet but feel connected to nevertheless. However, being a part of an amazing community of runners can sometimes mean that you play the comparison game. You see someone’s amazing race and feel badly about your times. You read another runner’s workout plan and feel the need to step yours up. If you allow these comparisons to take hold, it can very quickly to get an ugly place. Here are three tips to learning to run your own race:

  • Set small goals for yourself — and note once you reach them. If you follow along on my blog, you know that I’ve set an ambitious goal of running a sub-2 half marathon. This would be a huge PR for me and I’m hopeful I’ll hit that goal this fall. However, I’ve been setting lots of mini goals along the way and when I reach those goals, I feel accomplished. This helps keep me focused on how my running is improving and not getting caught up in a huge goal that may take a while to achieve.
  • Surround yourself with positive runner friends. Spend time with folks who will affirm your awesomeness and who don’t make you feel bad about yourself. I’m assuming that your friends don’t make you feel bad, but sometimes there is one friend who is constantly saying things like: “Oh, yeah, it was a terribly slow run. My average pace was 6:30 per mile. Ugh, what a struggle.” Those people don’t mean to bring bad running juju but of course, hearing someone complain about a time that you could never imagine running can be very disheartening. Don’t do it to yourself!
  • If those first two suggestions don’t work, take a break from social media. Sometimes, despite all your best intentions, it is easy to keep comparing yourself to others on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter. If that’s the case, take a break! Log off of social media for a weekend and relax! Realize that typically what people display on social media are their best selves. Not many people take a picture during the middle of their 10 mile run when they are absolutely dying and ready to quit. Taking a break can give you some distance and much needed perspective.

Above all, remember to be kind to yourself. Your pace, your workout, and your progress are all good enough because you are good enough. I know it sounds cheesy, but it turns out that it’s true!

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Women’s Running Partnership with The Feed http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/news/womens-running-partnership-with-the-feed_29238 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/news/womens-running-partnership-with-the-feed_29238#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 16:00:39 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29238

We worked with The Feed to pick out the best food to fuel your workouts! And they get delivered right to your door!

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WomenRunning (1)[2]

We are excited to announce that a Women’s Running fueling box is now available through The Feed! The partnership with The Feed is a great chance to get the best pre-run and post-run fuel to our readers.

What is The Feed? It’s a nutritional subscription service for athletes. The team at The Feed wants to make sure that endurance athletes get the best food available for their daily workouts. They test brands of gels, bars, drinks, and chews and offer advice and tips regarding their favorites. You can create a hand packed box full of every type of food you need to fuel your runs and delivered to your house on a monthly basis.

Our Women’s Running fuel box was hand picked by our editors. It includes everything you need to fuel your run, along with a free September issue of our magazine. The box is made up of brands you love and brands that will become new favorites. If you love our selections so much, you can have a box it sent to you every month. Just something to make your hectic life a little easier.

Check out our Women’s Running box on The Feed.

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Our 4 Favorite Nutritional Bars http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/our-4-favorite-nutritional-bars_29239 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/nutrition/our-4-favorite-nutritional-bars_29239#comments Fri, 29 Aug 2014 13:46:37 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29239

These 4 bars are our favorites to fuel our workouts.

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BEST OVERALL

Nii Almond Chocolate Chip
Why we love it…This bar combines two of our fave things—almond butter and dark chocolate—into one tasty little package. Every ingredient has the word “organic” in front of it and protein is provided by sprouted quinoa.
What it tastes like…Chewy and nut-buttery with plenty of chocolate chips.
When to eat it…With 240 calories and 8 grams of protein, this bar is hearty enough to work for a light breakfast, mid-day bite or a post-run snack.

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Testing Post http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/testing-post_29231 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/partnerconnect/testing-post_29231#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 20:37:31 +0000 Grace Cupat http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29231 My testing page

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My testing page

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6 Ways to Run Your Best While Traveling http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/active-travel/6-ways-to-run-your-best-while-traveling_29180 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/active-travel/6-ways-to-run-your-best-while-traveling_29180#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 19:31:38 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29180

Brooks elite runner, Angela Bizarri gives her pro tips for running fast while on the road.

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2011 ING NYC Marathon

Brooks elite runner, Angela Bizarri, traveled every other week to a race during this past spring. Check out her pro tips for running fast while on the road.

1. Run off the plane.
When you reach your destination, go for a short little run. Your legs will feel so much better after having been on a plane.

2. Wear compression.
I usually wear compression socks on flights. It makes me feel a little bit better when I land.

3. Try melatonin.
If you are racing on the East Coast and you live on the West Coast (or vice versa), the time zone change can be tough on your sleeping schedule. I use melatonin (a natural sleep aid) to help me go to bed at a normal hour and prevent jet lag.

4. Eat what you know.
When I’m traveling, I go to chain restaurants where I know what they serve. In the morning, I get my oatmeal at Starbucks. They have the same oatmeal everywhere, and I feel pretty comfortable with that. The night before a race, I like to eat rice and beans and chicken. I’ll go to Qudoba and get a normal bowl without any salsa or cheese.

5. Drink more water.
I usually travel with a water bottle to prevent getting dehydrated from the flight. Another tip: be careful with flip water bottles. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve spilled it on the person next to me!

6. Relax your mind.
I can be really frantic when I’m traveling. To stay calm and relaxed, I do things that feel normal. I’ll download podcasts that I’ll listen to when I’m going through the airport. It’s a nice way to separate yourself from all the chaos in the airport.

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T-Rex Runner: Not All Bad http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/t-rex-runner/t-rex-runner-gaining-perspective_29169 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/t-rex-runner/t-rex-runner-gaining-perspective_29169#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 16:30:36 +0000 T-Rex Runner http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29169

Every run is a good one when you get your own sign!

Danielle learns that pace and mileage aren't the only ways to determine if you've had a good run.

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Every run is a good one when you get your own sign!

Every run is a good one when you get your own sign!

Every run is a good one when you get your own sign!

I went out for a run the other day with a friend of mine who is much slower than me – not that I’m exactly breaking speed barriers myself. I hadn’t seen her in awhile, and I was looking forward to the chance to catch up and chat while we ran. As luck would have it, I had forgotten my Garmin that day, so I had no idea what pace we were going. At first, that kind of irked me. How was I supposed to know if the run was a success or failure? How would I know that we had gone exactly 8 miles and not (God forbid) 7.98? The horror!

As it turns out, it didn’t matter that I didn’t have my watch. It didn’t matter how fast we were going or how far. We were having too much fun to care. As we wrapped up the miles, I found myself thinking “That was a really good run.” The fact that I thought that came as a surprise; for most of my running career, the only thing that has mattered is how fast I went and how far. Did I stay under some arbitrarily assigned pace goal that I made for myself? Did I complete the assigned mileage for the day? If the answer to one or both of those questions (depending on the purpose of the run) was no, then it was not a good run. It was that simple for me.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about redefining success as you return to running after taking some time off for any number of reasons. It’s been a difficult lesson for me to learn, but the run this week is a sign that my shift in mentality is working. There’s more to running than just speed or distance; there’s also the camaraderie, the fellowship, the peace, and the joy. While I’m not naïve enough to think that every run is going to be a good one  – because let’s be honest, sometimes they just totally suck – I like the idea of having a lot more options in how I classify a run as good or bad.

An old running adage says that running is ninety percent mental and the rest is physical. While I always thought that meant that how successful you are on any given run has a lot more with how you think you’ll do than how your body actually feels, I now realize that there’s more to it. In running and in life, it’s all about perspective.

Read all of T-Rex Runner’s past posts for Women’s Running here.

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Get Ready to Run with these 5 Dynamic Warm-Up Moves http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/training-tips/get-ready-to-run-with-these-5-dynamic-warm-up-moves_29159 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/training-tips/get-ready-to-run-with-these-5-dynamic-warm-up-moves_29159#comments Thu, 28 Aug 2014 12:46:13 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29159

Work your kinks out before every run with this fast and easy warm-up.

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Ever feel a little rusty during the first mile of your run? As muscles start to work, it’s common to suffer from a case of the creaks. Avoid that achy sensation by oiling your joints before you set into your stride. Limbering up with dynamic movements is the best way to prep your legs for the miles. Try this quick and simple warm-up before any run or race to work out the kinks from head to toe.

Women’s Running Managing Editor Nicki Miller learned this sequence at Club Med Sandpiper Bay in Port St. Lucie, Florida. The all-inclusive resort features coaches who work with both aspiring world-class youth athletes as well as vacationing guests in running, tennis, golf, volleyball, and more.

Warm Up 101

When should I warm up? This sequence is designed to be performed right before you begin to run. But you can also do a light jog for about 5 minutes before you start the high knees.

Do I need to warm up before every run? Ideally, yes—whether it’s a neighborhood jog or a big race.

Why do I even need to warm up? The exercises will increase blood flow to your muscles, which helps prevent injury and will also improve performance

First Step

These exercises are designed to get your body in the best alignment for running. As you perform them, think about standing up straight and getting up on the balls of your feet. Look out ahead of you (not at your feet or the ground), so you’ll be able to breathe easy. Think of your airway as a straw—when you look down, you pinch off some of the airflow. You want as much oxygen fueling your body as possible!

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The 10 Commandments of Training for a Race http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/training-tips/the-10-commandments-of-training-for-a-race_29156 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/training-tips/the-10-commandments-of-training-for-a-race_29156#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 22:43:04 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29156

These tips will take you through the finish line with a smile on your face!

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couch to half marathon

These 10 commandments of training for a race will take you through the finish line with a smile on your face.

1. Warm up. Before every workout, walk for five minutes, or performing a few dynamic exercises to get ready to run.

2. Cool down. After every workout, walk for five minutes to bring your body back to normal. Start with a brisk walking pace and gradually slow it down.

3. Get social. Research suggests training in groups improves performance. This is especially important for long workouts. Find a running group, train with a buddy or join a social media group to learn from others and stay motivated along the way.

4. Perform dress rehearsals. Every long workout is an opportunity to practice your race-day nutrition. Find out what works for you, from your pre-race breakfast to on-the-run fueling and hydration.

5. Keep a log. Progression happens over time and in small increments. Keep track of your workouts in a training log, and you’ll be able to see how far you’ve come.

6. Rate yourself. At the end of every workout, log how you felt. If you start to see a lot of “not so hot’s” in a row, you’ll know to take a few days off to recover or modify your training plan and repeat an extra week before you progress to the next week (level).

7. Shoe shop. Get fitted for a pair of running shoes at your local running specialty store to make sure your kicks are right for you.

8. Lube up. Running creates friction, which causes painful chafing. Apply a sports lube (like BodyGlide) to all the places that rub together before your workouts, especially the long ones.

9. Hydrate. Invest in a multi-bottle waist hydration belt for your long workouts so that you can both carry water and a sports drink.

10. Celebrate every finish line. Running a half marathon is a gift that keeps on giving. Whether fast or slow, relish every finish!

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WRS Nashville Half: One Month To Go! http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/races/wrs-nashville-half-one-month-to-go_29132 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/races/wrs-nashville-half-one-month-to-go_29132#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 19:00:30 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29132

his is my response to my less-than-optimal run—patience is a definitely a runner's virtue (plus it gives me an excuse to take weird selfies).

Associate Editor Caitlyn Pilkington is sharing her journey to the starting line of the WRS Half in Nashville!

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his is my response to my less-than-optimal run—patience is a definitely a runner's virtue (plus it gives me an excuse to take weird selfies).

his is my response to my less-than-optimal run—patience is a definitely a runner's virtue (plus it gives me an excuse to take weird selfies).

his is my response to my less-than-optimal run—patience is a definitely a runner’s virtue (plus it gives me an excuse to take weird selfies).

The 30 days leading up to your big race is always a reality—and gut—check. How much have you REALLY been training? Is your nutrition dialed? Did you have too many beers last night? Are you actually registered for the race? Well, if you’re not—register to run with me at womensrunning.com/Nashville. (I mean, you get a sweet medal and free mimosas at the finish—basically a no brainer!)

I invite all you lady runners to follow along as I expose some real training truths over the next four weeks before I toe the line at Women’s Running Nashville on Sept. 27 in Tennessee—hopefully with all of you! The first truth? I haven’t really been training—at least I don’t call it that. For the first time since I was a wee high school student, my running has become more of a habit in the high-mileage area of half-marathon training. That basically means that running is routine, so my routine is basically training without having to be in the training mindset. (I’m going to chew off my first marathon in January, so I’ll be sure to humbly grumble about how that’s not the truth toward the end of the year.)

That said, I ran last night and discovered that I still call to music to get me off my butt sometimes. That is until my iPod died mid-run, and I turned to the crashing waves and light foot pounding to guide me home. It was actually pretty calming and eased a lot of nerves that build up during Mondays. The sunset was just setting as well—I sidestepped a small leashed furrball to snap a photo!

Still, the run was honestly less than optimal. I’ve been pretty wishy washy about running for the last two weeks or so, partly due to exhaustion, partly do to resting before marathon training. But I survived and rallied to finish 6 miles and work up a sweat before dinner. I also reeled in a realistic and satisfying goal for the race: go under 1:42, which is my general standing goal for all half marathons.

Plus, I had my Hokas, so those gave me some extra spring. Note for the notoriously injured runner (me): Hokas are a great transition shoe from no running to running again. The added cushion makes a formerly fractured foot very happy.

Other than that, there was nothing really to report home about—I snapped some photos of the gorg area I live in. Whenever you need an added pull out the door, soak in the scenery of your surroundings. We live in this world, and it’s a pretty sweet place to run.

Follow along every Wednesday and Friday leading up to #WRSNashville to see what other mischief Caitlyn gets into during her runs—and don’t forget to follow @runwrs on Instagram and Twitter for race-day announcements!

Register for the 5K or half marathon at womensrunning.com/Nashville before the price increases on August 31. Save an extra $15* with online code RUNWITHCAIT. If you have training questions for your own half marathon, tweet @caitpilk!

*Code valid for half marathon only

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NYC Running Mama: 10 Things Running Has Taught Me http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/nyc-running-mama-10-things-running-has-taught-me_29135 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/nyc-running-mama-10-things-running-has-taught-me_29135#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 16:39:47 +0000 NYC Running Mama http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29135

"Mile 26.2 of your life is no more important than all the miles leading up to it."

Throughout the years, Michele has learned many important lessons while on the run.

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"Mile 26.2 of your life is no more important than all the miles leading up to it."

When I first started running, it solely a physical activity. I signed up for my first race as a way to get in the best shape I could before I graduated and went on active duty in the Army. Over the next five years, unit physical training, bi-annual fitness tests and the desire to stay fit meant running was something I “had” to do – it was never something that I chose to do. And thus, I never had the opportunity to develop a relationship with running.

It wasn’t until years later, when my relationship with running changed into love, that I began to see how much running was teaching me. It is WAY MORE than just a physical activity. It’s an emotional and spiritual one as well. And I find that the more time I spend with running, the more I learn – about myself, others and really, just life in general.

So here are the Top 10 Things Running Has Taught Me About Life:

1. There is no secret recipe for success. You get out what you put in. Work hard and results will come.

2. Everything is temporary. There will be low periods in runs just as there are in life. Remind yourself that even the lowest point will eventually pass. Continue to put one foot in front of the other and better miles and days are ahead.

3. Stop comparing yourself to others. There will always be someone faster/better and you’ll never be satisfied with your own successes if you are comparing them to others.

4. Take chances and dream big. Step outside of your comfort zone and be okay with failure. There is no shame in it.

5. Problems always look clearer and more manageable after a run. Don’t make any big decisions until you’ve had the time to think about them.

6. Learn to be comfortable with being uncomfortable. Expect it to be difficult and be ready for it. The best views are at the top of the tallest mountains.

7. Don’t let your past control you. Learn from the bad experiences, but don’t let them weigh you down. Let the good experiences strengthen you, but don’t solely rely on them. Focus and live in the moment.

8. Strengthening your mind is just as, if not more, important than strengthening your body. Your mind will be ready to quit before your body.

9. It’s about the journey, not the finish line. If you are so focused on the end result, you will miss the experiences along the way. Mile 26.2 of your life is no more important than all the miles leading up to it. Enjoy the steps along the way.

10. No matter how hard you work and how ready you may be, disappointments will still happen.

What is the most important lesson running has taught you? Tweet @nycrunningmama and @womensrunning to let us know!

Read all of NYC Running Mama’s posts for Women’s Running here.

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]]> http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/photos/nyc-running-mama-10-things-running-has-taught-me_29135/feed 0 All-Day Habits For a Better Night’s Sleep http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/health-wellness/all-day-habits-for-a-better-nights-sleep_29124 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/health-wellness/all-day-habits-for-a-better-nights-sleep_29124#comments Wed, 27 Aug 2014 13:00:03 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29124

Your daily habits can have a huge effect on how well you sleep at night!

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shutterstock_184441376

*Content courtesy of POPSUGAR Fitness

Think that your before-bed habits are the only thing affecting your quality of sleep? Guess again. Your habits all day long can have major implications on how you feel when you hit the hay. Read up to get the best shut-eye possible!

Morning

  1. Keep your wake-up time consistent: Different wake-up times every day of the week can mess with your sleep-wake cycle. When you start waking up at the same time — and skip the weekend sleep-ins — you’ll find yourself waking up sans alarm with more energy at the same time.
  2. Let the light in: Natural sunlight keeps your internal clock on a healthy cycle. As soon as you wake up, open your windows or turn on the light. Get out for a few moments of sunshine if possible!
  3. Breathe deep: When you start your day on a centered note, the benefits of a relaxed, focused mind will support your entire day and night. Begin a meditation practice or simply show some gratitude with a positive affirmation when you rise. Although bedtime is hours and hours away, a calm mind can help you achieve quality shut-eye later.

Afternoon

  1. Drink green tea: You might be tempted to reach for that second cup of coffee in the afternoon, but opt for green tea instead. It will give your body a boost — with a ton of extra benefits — and is less likely to affect your sleep later that night.
  2. Eat omega-3s at lunch: New research shows that regularly eating omega-3 fatty acids can help reduce sleep issues. Load up foods like salmon, flaxseed, and avocado at lunch to support a better night’s sleep.
  3. Fit in a workout: It doesn’t matter whether it’s morning, noon, or night — make time to exercise! You’ll drift to sleep more naturally after you’ve pushed your body. Just be sure not to go for intense cardio right before bed. Yoga is a great option to help your mind cool down if you need to work out later in the evening.

Evening

  1. Take time to chill: To promote quality sleep and be able to drift off easily, it’s important to take time to calm your mind and body. Whether it’s a hot bath, a few chapters of a book, or you spend some time journaling, make yourself a priority, and wind down naturally.
  2. Skip the nightcap: After a long day, a few glasses of wine or a nice cocktail might seem like the perfect way to let loose, but alcohol can disrupt your natural sleep cycle and leave you feeling exhausted the following morning. If you’re serious about getting a good night’s sleep, it’s best to just say no to alcohol before bed.
  3. Turn off electronics: If you keep your electronics on all night, it is affecting your sleep patterns. Before bed, skip the tube or your laptop, and wind down with an article or book instead. This change seems small but makes an enormous difference in how you sleep through the night.

Related Links:

What You Need To Know Before You Start Trail Running
Spirulina: One of the Best Protein Sources You Probably Aren’t Eating
5 Tips for Big Weight Loss
Late Schedule? No Problem! How to Have the Best Nighttime Workout Ever
How I Tricked Myself Into Running 8 Miles

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Photo Gallery: Readers and their Running Pups http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/just-for-fun/photo-gallery-readers-and-their-running-pups_29078 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/just-for-fun/photo-gallery-readers-and-their-running-pups_29078#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 22:13:58 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29078

In honor of National Dog Day, our readers shared photos of their favorite four legged partners.

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Canine running partners are the best. They are always ready for a few miles. They get excited to trot right next to you. And they definitely understand the importance of a recovery nap. In honor of National Dog Day, we wanted to celebrate your favorite four legged friends. Readers tweeted and emailed photos of their pups to us. Check out our gallery to see the cutest running buddies around. 

Related:

Running with Your Pup
4 Tips for Running with your Dog
Running Exercise for Shelter Dogs

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]]> http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/just-for-fun/photo-gallery-readers-and-their-running-pups_29078/feed 0 The Creation of Moving Comfort’s Jubralee Bra http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/shoes-gear/the-creation-of-moving-comforts-jubralee-bra_29067 http://womensrunning.competitor.com/2014/08/shoes-gear/the-creation-of-moving-comforts-jubralee-bra_29067#comments Tue, 26 Aug 2014 19:05:19 +0000 Jessica Sebor http://womensrunning.competitor.com/?p=29067

The bra that allowed “supportive” and “lightweight” to coexist in harmony.

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Moving Comfort’s Jubralee Bra finally allowed “supportive” and “lightweight” to coexist in harmony. Here is the story behind its development.

The Method

Since its inception in 1977, Moving Comfort has delivered functional workout gear to active women. At the beginning of every season, the company dissects the desires of their target customer by analyzing her lifestyle, from her behaviors, habits and patterns to her product expectations and preferences. Moving Comfort’s design team of 20 women and men then seeks inspiration from trend tips and trade shows, even looking at fashion and lingerie for designs, seasonal colors and prints.

Consumer Report

In 2011, Moving Comfort found that women runners with larger chests were being underserved. “We uncovered a need for a high-support bra without the bulk in a larger size range that was easy to get on and off,” says Laura Madden, the company’s technical bra design manager.

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