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Do This Foot Treatment Tonight Before You Go To Sleep

“Why cause pain to get out of pain?” If you’ve struggled with the agonies of foam rolling or deep-tissue massage, you can probably relate to this statement by Sue Hitzmann. The former fitness instructor who hosted “Crunch TV” on ESPN has morphed into a guru who teaches people how to heal. Her program of DVDs, books and equipment you can use at home or in studios with certified teachers is called the Melt Method.

Her exercises might look similar to foam rolling, which often uses a harder roller to release the fascia that covers muscles. But her movements are much smaller and targeted with a soft roller to address what she calls “stuck stress,” which causes aches due to connective-tissue dehydration, compression, neurological imbalance and faulty body sense.

Before bed or when you wake up feeling stiff in the morning…

For this foot treatment, try to keep your head up and not look at your feet. Instead, use your body sense to feel if you have the ball in the right spot. You can stand next to a wall or chair to help you balance, if necessary. Keep the pressure tolerable, and if you feel pain, back off.

Tools You Need

Soft roller or towel

For most of the exercises, you’ll need a soft roller or rolled-up beach towels or a traditional, firm roller wrapped in a towel, blanket or yoga mat.

Soft ball

The Melt Method sells its own soft ball, but you can use a cushy dog ball or a Kadima or paddle ball.

Water

For this method to rehydrate cells and connective tissue, you need to drink water. Hitzmann recommends sipping it consistently throughout the day.

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Nicki Miller

Nicki Miller

Nicki Miller is the managing editor for Women's Running and spearheads our nutrition coverage. She’s an avid runner but also loves cycling (both on and off-road), yoga and all kinds of crazy videos to do at home. Formerly the editor of Martha’s Vineyard Magazine, Nicki started her journalism career at The Washington Post. Her first races were duathlons (run, bike, run) in her twenties with her husband, and then triathlons, completing the White Lake Half Ironman in North Carolina. Since joining Women’s Running in 2013, she’s been more focused on half marathons and trail running. Some of her proudest moments have been running the Boston Marathon (first 26.2), and becoming an RRCA certified running coach and helping others take up the sport.