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10 Uptempo ’90s Pop Hits For Your Workout Mix

We’ve put together a time capsule for your ears. In the lead up to a new millennium, Friends popularized The Rachel hairstyle, Titanic became the highest-grossing film of all time, and J.K. Rowling introduced the world to a young wizard named Harry Potter. In the playlist below, we’ve rounded up some of musical highlights to keep you company on your next run.

The mix kicks off with the title track of Ace of Base’s debut album and closes out with one of Mariah Carey’s signature hits. Along the way, you’ll find a hit from New Kids on the Block and another from original member Marky Mark. (He left early on–making way for Joey McIntyre.) Elsewhere there are crossover hits from Shania Twain and Shaggy along with the Cher song that launched the Auto-Tune craze. For a jog (or run) down memory lane, you can fire up the entire list. Alternatively, you pick out just the forgotten favorites and use them to round-out an existing mix. Either way, a poppy glance at the past awaits below.

Ace of Base – The Sign – 98 BPM

Everything But the Girl – Missing (Todd Terry Remix) – 124 BPM

Janet Jackson – Together Again – 123 BPM

New Kids on the Block – Step by Step – 125 BPM

Shania Twain – Man! I Feel Like a Woman! – 125 BPM

Crystal Waters – 100% Pure Love – 121 BPM

Shaggy – Oh Carolina – 124 BPM

Cher – Believe – 133 BPM

Marky Mark, The Funky Bunch & Loleatta Holloway – Good Vibrations – 122 BPM

Mariah Carey – Fantasy – 102 BPM

To find more workout songs, folks can check out the free database at Run Hundred. Visitors can browse the song selections there by genre, tempo, and era—to find the music that best fits with their particular workout routine.

Chris Lawhorn

Chris Lawhorn runs the workout music database Run Hundred and contributes playlists to Women's Running. He also operates the Case/Martingale record label and holds a BA in English from Ball State University. Before joining Women's Running, Chris covered workout music for Shape and Marie Claire. To find more running songs, folks can check out the free database at Run Hundred. Visitors can browse the song selections there by genre, tempo, and era—to find the music that best fits with their particular routine.